HIV Children and Orphans are Defacto Test Subjects

We’re having an increase in referrals over the last years to deal with medication adherence. There are a fair number of children whose HIV illness may be well controlled but whose families are experiencing difficulty complying with the child’s medication regimen.” By “referrals,” Painter means children who are torn from parents and returned to the various agencies when these parents and guardians balk at dispensing the investigational drugs.

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People Cheaper Than Cats

So, in New Orleans, where it was cheaper to use niggers than cats, because they were everywhere and cheap experimental animals—there wasn’t much working there, the people we have been picking for the operation has [sic] really been at the bottom of the can. Nothing is going to help them—shoot them is the only thing—so they started to use them, Negroes—patients in hospitals—and so, the same area, little box, was put on their paws with a button.

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Medical Data Exploitation

CODIS went online in 1998 with samples from 8,000 convicted child molesters, and by 2001, it contained the profiles of 1.5 million felons. In 2002, the U.S. Attorney General ordered the FBI to expand CODIS to 50 million profiles, and by 2004, CODIS stored 2.6 million samples containing the DNA of people convicted of almost any crime. In October 2005, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved a law, which was pending when this book went to print, to force anyone who is merely detained by federal authorities to provide DNA, and in August 2006 the database contained more than 3.5 million samples. The FBI predicts that CODIS will accommodate 50 million samples “in the near future.”

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Children as Test Subjects

The National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research concluded in 1977 that children were an especially vulnerable population because they could not offer consent. Yet, children today are more likely to become research subjects now that federal policies begun in the mid-1990s have changed the face of the “typical research subject.”

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Brain Surgery for Docility

From the 1960s through the early 1970s, disenchantment with the widespread use of tranquilizers fostered interest in brain surgery as an alternative to “quiet” patients. University of Mississippi neurosurgeon Orlando J. Andy, M.D., capitalized on this trend, performing many types of brain ablations, including thalamotomies (destruction of the thalamus, which controls emotions and analyzes sensations), on African American children as young as six who, he decided, were “aggressive” and “hyperactive”…Today, Andy is revered as a neurosurgical pioneer, one whose work was never challenged in his lifetime and who never suffered any disciplinary action

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