Anyone Can Be Mad

Snake: I’ve heard of you! You’re that billionaire mad scientist.

Wolf: Billionaire mad scientist? He’s a guinea pig!

Marmalade: So what?! Just because I’m a guinea pig, I CAN’T BE a billionaire MAD scientist?

Wolf: Oh. Well, no…I supposed you could be…

The Bad Guys (book 3) by Aaron Blabey

Growing Up and Staying Me

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Leaping a, and looping with his little striped friends, Verdi laughed. “I may be big and very green, but I’m still me!”

Verdi by Janell Cannon

Distance Provides Perspective

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Out of Range

“I was locked
Into being my mother’s daughter
I was just eating bread and water
Thinking nothing ever changes
And I was shocked
To see the mistakes of each generation
Will just fade like a radio station
If you drive out of range”

Out of Range by Ani DiFranco

Giggle Book Award: Nooooooo!

This month’s Giggle Book Award goes to a story about a little boy who wants to be a dragon and a couple of dragons who want to be able to do things only little boys can do.

The entire book consists of a dialog between boy and dragons. Here’s an example:

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Boy: Look at me, look at me! I’m a scary dragon. ROAR!
Dragon: No, you’re not.
Boy: Hmph. I am toothy and I am fierce. See?
Dragon: Actually, you are cute. Really cute.

Finally, the boy gives up and begins to cry. His cry consists of a loud and long wail:

“Waaaaaaaaaa!”

This whiny wail, when played up by the reader, inspires all sorts of giggling.

A little later, in the book the dragons also give up and utter and long wailing cry:

“Waaaaaaaaaa!”

Yep, lots of giggling.

In the end, boy and dragons all realize they are just perfect the way they are…and playing Frankenstein is much more fun.

It’s a very cute book. Perfect for anyone who likes to use story time as an opportunity to indulge in a little readers-theater style acting.

ROAR!, written by Tammi Sauer and illustrated by Liz Starin.

Remember Who You Are

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Keep It Loose

“Well I walked over the bridge
Into the city where I live,
And I saw my old landlord.
Well we both said hello,
There was no where else to go,
‘cuz his rent I couldn’t afford.”

“But sometimes,
We forget what we got,
Who we are.
Or who we are not.
I think we gotta chance,
To make it right.”

Amos Lee by Amos Lee

Not Pretty, Not Angry, Just Honest

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Not A Pretty Girl

“I am not a pretty girl
That is not what I do
I ain’t no damsel in distress
And I don’t need to be rescued”

“I am not an angry girl
But it seems like I’ve got everyone fooled
Every time I say something
They find hard to hear
They chalk it up to my anger
And never to their own fear
And imagine you’re a girl
Just trying to finally come clean
Knowing full well they’d prefer
You were dirty and smiling”

Not A Pretty Girl by Ani DiFranco

Not Mine to Choose

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She is a person in her own right, and she does not belong to me. I do not get to choose what she becomes just because I can’t deal with who she is.

Allegiant (Divergent Trilogy, Book 3) by Veronica Roth

True Beauty

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“Color fills her cheeks, and I think it again: that Johanna Reyes might still be beautiful. Except now I think that she isn’t just beautiful in spite of the scar, she’s somehow beautiful with it, like Lynn with her buzzed hair, like Tobias with the memories of his father’s cruelty that he wears like armor, like my mother in her plain gray clothing.”

Insurgent (Divergent Book 2) by Veronica Roth

 

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I notice that she has pulled her hair back on both sides, to reveal the scar in its entirety. She looks better that way—stronger, when she is not hiding behind a curtain of hair, hiding who she is.

Allegiant (Divergent Trilogy, Book 3) by Veronica Roth

Don’t Make Me Say It

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You Can’t Treat Me That Way

“You’ve got a woman who knows her worth
And ain’t prepared to compromise it
You better listen you better make it better
But don’t make me say
You can’t treat me that way”

Kate Earl by Kate Earl

 

Poverty Survivor Pride: No Shame In Being Poor

Poverty Survivor Defined

Poverty Survivor (White) Tee Shirt

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A Poverty Survivor is any human being who has survived poverty. The individual may have been poor at some time in the past, in the throes of survival right now, or a member of a family that has (as far anyone knows) always been poor. It’s not about the duration or the cause, it’s about the ability to survive.

Why I Am A Survivor

There is no shame in being poor.
There is no shame in being born into poverty.
There is no shame in having family who is poor.
There is no shame in being homeless.
There is no shame in facing a serious financial crisis.
There is no shame in complete financial life change.

I Am Your Equal (white) Tee Shirt

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Poverty is a life experience.
I have faced this experience and lived to tell the tale.
I have gained skills.
I have made friends.
I have discovered inner strength.
I have successfully faced thousands of seemingly impossible challenges.
I have gotten through the worst, even when it did not seem possible.

I. Have. Survived.

Therefore, I am a survivor.
I have a right to my pride.

No Shame In Being Poor (white) Tshirt

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What Poverty Is NOT

It is not a crime.
It is not a sin.
It is not proof of God’s wrath.
It is not proof that a shameful/sinful/criminal act has been committed.
It is not proof of laziness or poor work ethic.
It is not proof of low intelligence.
It is not proof of poor money management skills.

Poverty Happens
People do not deserve poverty.
People do not choose poverty.
Poverty is not a ‘lifestyle.’

Poverty is not absolute.
Those with wealth may one day see poverty.
Those in poverty may one day see wealth.

Poverty Survivor (Black) Shirt

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Claim Your Pride

Discussions about poverty are to often overshadowed with shame and fear. The process of getting out of poverty frequently involves trying to pass as upper class while hiding both experiences and family connections.

There is no shame in being poor. Addressing the problems people in poverty face is a difficult process made more difficult by our own shame. Proudly declaring that you have survived poverty helps to break down that culture of shame.

We have the right to be treated with respect.
We have the right to aspire to better.
We have the right to hold our heads high.
We have a right to our pride.